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Who was Cassandra?

  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.



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January 15, 2007


Nice writing.

I have a set of LC recordings of Great American Poets on vinyl - haven't listened to it in years. There's a certain sameness to it - not only in topics covered but in the way they *declaimed* poetry back then.

Good post to begin my day.

This covers a great distance, Beth, and does so beautifully.

I especially like the way your memory suddenly dipped into the late 18th century and your ancestors' journeys--nothing began today, not even today.

Thanks, Dave. I agree - the poets who read differently and unselfconsciously really stood out.

Uma, I'm glad! Thanks.

Teju, thank you. There was a lot of that casting back and forth in time during this trip - I'll try to capture some more of it. (I was worried I had tried to cover too much here, so I'm glad if it came off at all!)

I loved "black satin ribbon against the black homespun of field and forest." Absolutely perfect, and a piece of writing worthy of those you were listening to!

"a golden moon rose like a cello" — synaesthetically exquisite.

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