My Photo

Who was Cassandra?


  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.

MY SMALL PRESS


MY ONLINE SHOP

« Un Rendez-vous Dentaire (III) | Main | Un Rendez-vous Dentaire (V) »

February 23, 2009

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c643353ef01127905438228a4

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Un Rendez-vous Dentaire (IV):

Comments

. . . and yet had always yearned toward an expressiveness that was not really Latin or Mediterranean, born in sunshine and abundance, but darker and more hidden, like embers surrounded by snow, or a candlelit room full of talk and wine and music into which people tumble out of a dark night, shaking the snow from their coats.

A beautiful line.

I started reading Tolstoy's short stories last fall, and that entrance into a warm room, "shaking the snow from their coats," may capture what I like about them.

This reminds me of a Russian woman and her daughter who shared our house when I was an undergraduate. At times she seemed the most serious and fretful of women, but when it was just the residents in the house, she became almost childlike in her fondness for party games and enthusiastic displays of affection. This proved true of the other Russian women who visited the house (it was a Russian language dorm) - it was like they knew that life was hard, and that was why it was silly to be self-conscious about enjoying yourself - whether that entailed eating a good meal or playing games of the sort we hasten to outgrow as soon as possible. There's a lot of fun piling as many people as you can onto a sofa and then jostling to see who falls off first, or playing tag indoors, when you relax and stop worrying about whether it's "cool" to do so!

Yes. I have very fond memories of a Russian family I knew in Montreal years ago. My boyfriend and I were very young and very poor, they accepted us without question, took us along on weekends to their summer place and fed us until we couldn't eat another morsel. I'll never forget "eat, eat, you're too thin" and the borsch.
The music always seems so natural to me. I think that, as reserved Yankees we are drawn to that outgoing warmth and lack of self consciousness.

"...an expressiveness that was not really Latin or Mediterranean, born in sunshine and abundance, but darker and more hidden, like embers surrounded by snow, or a candlelit room full of talk and wine and music into which people tumble out of a dark night, shaking the snow from their coats."

You definitely captured its depth in that sentence, Beth.

Si je peux me permettre, Cassandra, we don't say «l'économie, l'huile ... but l'économie, le pétrole ...».

Bonjour Sally! Et merci - maybe they were talking about all that delicious Canadian olive oil?? Thank you for the correction - I'll fix it right away. I wish my French readers would always correct my embarrassing mistakes!

It's good to hear from you, hope all is well...

The comments to this entry are closed.