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Who was Cassandra?


  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.

MY SMALL PRESS


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February 04, 2010

Comments

I am reading your post in the early dusk of a rainy afternoon, and it brings such beautiful light, from the heart, illuminating the deep ties we weave even as our worlds seem to be unraveling.

Lovely, Beth. Your mind weaves words into a bittersweet yet somehow transcendent whole. I love the idea you expressed here.

Beautiful, eloquent wise words, Beth. I've had some thoughts like these now what we're the elders in our family, seeing grandchildren growing and ourselves aging. I'm sounding like my mother telling family stories...

You so often express the sentiments that lie hidden in my heart

I'm just amazed and moved by the picture, which holds every nuance of your words. Sending you hugs and fellow-feeling. Being able to make beautiful shapes and patterns out of the hardest feelings is important, and does help - others, as well as, I hope, yourself.

Hmmmm...these are the golden moments, the wisdom that should come to everyone. Beautifully written, Beth.

Beautiful. Sensitive. Made me reflect much.

We enter so we may one day leave. We draw strength from the belief that we'll be remembered after we're gone, drawing comfort from the possibility that we'll live on in another's memories of us. It is such continuity that enables humanity to survive the vagaries of physical uncertainty.

Now, with the blog, there's hope still that in the ether somewhere someone will search their way to us without seeking us, and will hopefully stay on for the stories we had to tell.

Beth, thoughts so beautifully expressed - how we are a fragment in this large continuum of existence.

I love the sense of continuity I feel in your writings about your and your husband's families. It reminds me that we are, indeed, holding hands with previous and subsequent generations. There's a lot to think about here. Thanks, Beth.

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