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Who was Cassandra?


  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.

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November 22, 2010

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oh Beth!

Beth, this was wonderful. A snapshot out of time. It's amazing how different we seem in just ten years. Every year at Thanksgiving, I look in an old cookbook for the recipe for dressing that my mother gave me over the phone the first time I made my first Thanksgiving turkey--must have been more than 35 years ago. I distinctly remember jotting down the directions, confident that my Mom would guide me through this rite of passage. Good memories. Hope you have a wonderful holiday!

Beth, okra is available in the UK but is mainly used in Indian cookery. Chicken and Okra (also called bhindi) balti is a favourite.

And that's an excellent/terrible pun in the recipe headline: The Zuppa Club!

Wow, Beth. It took me a while to comment because I found this rather disconcerting. Ten years is a long time, isn't it? This voice is not familiar to me. Does she feel a bit unfamiliar even to you, I wonder?

And, yes, okra/bindhi are widely available in UK - most commonly for use in Indian cuisine, but also in Caribbean and African (whence, I presume, the Southern US connection). Yum.

Great recipe. Perfect for Christmas in Montreal. I love vegetables. =)

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