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Who was Cassandra?


  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.

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January 20, 2011

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Dreams are mysterious, even when we understand, there is a mist of wonder.

Thank you for sharing.

Good one.

Fits so well with your descriptions of him when he was alive - maybe he's sending you a postcard from the Other Side?

This is so lovely - a beautifully formed flash-story where we all know the characters and the back-story, all wrapped in the mystery and immediacy of the dream state. For you, I'm sure, much more disturbing, as it always is when we dream of the dead - not that we'd wish not to, but...

Yes, dreams are so mysterious, and show what wonderful imagination the mind has when unconscious. I don't know if you've had this experience, but I occasionally start to dream when I'm still very slightly awake, and can see my mind begin a dream, which as usual amalgamates recent experiences and the past into a strange almost surrealist novel! - something I could never do when conscious. Perhaps your dream shows sorrow at the loss of your father-in-law, and that he's now unreachable. However, probably one shouldn't presume to interpret other people's dreams - everyone is so many-layered. It would be interesting if we could always wake up remembering our dreams - I only remember a few.

This is my favorite from January. Without doubt. Your father-in-law posts always drew me in. This one is no different.

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