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Who was Cassandra?


  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.

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October 19, 2012

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The arts all frolic in the Land of Synesthesia...

The arts all frolic in the Land of Synesthesia...

That's a really beautiful watercolour. But it's not about sound; it's about smell--as evidenced by the two noses on the left.

That is an incredibly evocative painting. At first I was taken with the bursting energy of the yellow, and then I saw the crowd of people in the upper third. And then.....fantastic!

I decided to play your topmost painting; cor, didn't my fingers get into a tangle, with no recognisable tune emerging. After the twentieth time, and shoving it up an octave, faint echoes resonated out of my past and I had to know, I had to know. On the one-thousand, seven-hundred and thirty-first go I had a mangled but just about serviceable version of the Waldstein. Seems you're marching in step with greatness.

All of these responses are pretty delightful!

I love the title of this piece! And how have you made those colours both vivid and muted? I suppose that mimics the disarray of memory itself!

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