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Who was Cassandra?


  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.

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November 11, 2012

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The power of this poem lies in its subtlety - the IMPLIED sorrow and history and millions of losses - mourned for in the singing - in IMPLICATION the meaning is made stronger, more arresting. I like the way you've also implied pain, something as simple as throat pain as a microcosm for the wider pain of war.

Thank you, London accountant. You've seen things in the poem that I didn't consciously put there, but were definitely on my mind.

I also wondered, at the time of writing, about the choice of "murky", as tea often isn't, but somehow that word seemed to insist to be included -- and I think it was a reflection of the murky ambivalence of the Remembrance Day message for me.

Thank you, London accountant. Everything you see in this poem, I do not consciously put it there, but must be in my heart.

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