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Who was Cassandra?


  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.

MY SMALL PRESS


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November 15, 2005

Comments

Beth, it is good to read htat you are recuperating and coming back into your own. Your advice on writing and painting hit home on both counts for me. I've been eeking out an art project bit by bit, compulsively planning it because it is in a round robin with other more talented artists. I am just going to do it tonight.

"You have to practice a lot, I think, and learn to trust yourself." This is the heart of any writing program, it's the whole enchilada.

Glad you're feeling better!

(o)

It is good to hear of you here again, with words flowing all over the place.

Well said, Beth. Glad to hear the book is going so well.

Thanks for the update (and the useful advice). We're thinking of you.

I've heard this piece of advice (don't edit yourself as you write) before, and sadly, I'm a slow learner and a compulsive self-editor. I am delighted to know, though, that _you_ are making progress--on all fronts!

I'm glad to hear you're feeling so much better - and getting near to completing your book. That's so exciting! Interesting points on balancing inspiration and technique - and trusting oneself.

hey beth, this is lovely and so true. there is nothing like the gesture that travels from our heart in the moment through our body onto the page:canvas:instrument. Like a caress, it will always be honest that way.

hey beth, this is lovely and so true. there is nothing like the gesture that travels from our heart in the moment through our body onto the page:canvas:instrument. Like a caress, it should always be honest.

Hear hear here to all that. Beth, the dangers of losing something fresh, visual or verbal, by over-editing or overworking are all too familiar to me. It's a terrible struggle to stop one's self from reading over and going back to "improve" things constantly instead of forging ahead and doing the clearing much later. A gadget that delivers minor electric shocks would be very useful for putting a stop to such cowardic (that's what it is: not wanting to show one's self in public without make-up).
Congratulations for your book and your health's great progress. XX

I meant cowardice of course.

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