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May 14, 2008

Comments

It really is wonderful to take one's time and go the back road, to discover the hills and fields, the rocks and waterfalls (very Rauschenbergian indeed!). Glad you had this time, Beth, so good for the spirit!

Beautiful. I love the way you look at the world and then tell us about what you saw. That top picture is fabulous. I just want to crawl into it.

Marja-Leena, I thought of you all the time I was staring at that rock wall - it seemed so alive with messages, even though none were petroglyphs!

Kaycie - thanks. It was a gorgeous spot on a perfect day - but that landscape must seem pretty different from where you are!

How awesome, Beth, I'm very touched that you were thinking the way I do when looking at rock! At the same time you were inspired by Rauschenberg in the neat way you manipulated the photo of the rock wall.

'...emptiness rich with possibilities'....what a lovely phrase, and may you experience much more of that very creative state.

No one who reads your blog could fail to be changed in their thinking about rocks, Marja-Leena! I've always loved them, and especially these sorts of road cuts and outcrops, but didn't connect them with art in the same way at all until I met you.

P.E.A. - thanks very much! So often it is nature that opens up that space for me, maybe for you too?

(o)

I love rock walls like that. Good find!

Kia ora Beth,
"To sit and watch Nature paint her paintings and play her music", that really resonates with me. I have a favourite spot in the mountains here in New Zealand, and I love to just sit there and watch. It is never the same, and always beautiful no matter what the weather. Glad you enjoyed an excellent day - you make me a bit home sick for my native Wisconsin. Kia ora Beth.
Ka kite,
Robb

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Who was Cassandra?


  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.

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