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March 28, 2011

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(The photo is what the quilt looks like when I look up from a book, without my glasses.)

Hmm. Looks as if you're about as nearsighted as I am. Interesting idea, to try and show what that's like with a photo.

You never answered the question. Cassandras must answer!

I ordered that book and misplaced it after about the ninth story. No doubt when it surfaces I will read a few more.

Dave, one must attempt to show what Christmas trees look like without one's glasses! One of the few enjoyable features of being near-sighted.

Gives one a funny feeling to see something out of focus when wearing glasses, doesn't it?

Wait -- what question didn't I answer, Marly?? You're right, Cassandra must answer!

The one your husband asked!

Hmm. Yes, I guess I wasn't completely forthcoming! I was reading (as I had said earlier) "The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis." When he asked "Are they good?" I didn't answer but instead read him a couple. But my own answer is that they are fantastic. I love them, and her quirky way of writing, which opens up possibilities in my own head. He did not, however, ask me what I thought about the oboe!

And as for the oboe, perhaps that is just as well!

Great post. Another great post!

I've read this several times today. Don't know why except that I really like it, and the first line makes me smile because I know that feeling too well... that throwing myself into some online discussion and then wishing I'd used the time otherwise. You capture that feeling really well here.

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Who was Cassandra?


  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.

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