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Who was Cassandra?


  • In the Iliad, she is described as the loveliest of the daughters of Priam (King of Troy), and gifted with prophecy. The god Apollo loved her, but she spurned him. As a punishment, he decreed that no one would ever believe her. So when she told her fellow Trojans that the Greeks were hiding inside the wooden horse...well, you know what happened.

MY SMALL PRESS


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July 18, 2012

Comments

I think this is wonderful! Good for you for being brave and energetic!

Practically wetting myself, I snagged those blueberries! So, so happy...

How exciting, and it looks lovely! Wishing you much success! I've been exploring similar options for a long time but am still on the fence. Will watch your venture with interest.

Good luck with this project. I admire your long-term commitment to art. The problem today is the proliferation of bad art at all levels of consumption. The best selling art these days in the U.S. (and it's considered to be high art worth paying a lot of money for!) is stuff like the pop pornography of artists like Lisa Yuskavage and John Currin. I seldom see any art that arouses anything but the faintist interest in me, because it's bland, flat, commercial in some way or other or otherwise kitschy and vulgar.

Thanks, NT -- you've been encouraging me to do it, and now I've plunged!

Pica: Thank you so much!! I couldn't be happier than to have the first sale go to you, and to know those New England blueberries will be on your wall.

Marja-Leena, thank you -- it's difficult to know what to do, isn't it? Having made my first sale, of course I feel pretty positive at the moment -- we'll see how it goes.

Yes, Hattie, I agree with you, and that's the sad state of things in a world where art is a commodity, artists seek fame and quick bucks, and people are very unsure of their own taste.

At the risk of sounding ______ (not sure how to fill in this blank--naive? like a philistine? bourgeouis? very low brow?), I'd love notecards in your shop. I lack much wall space for art (and until recently, the funds), but I've always loved being able to buy notecards--in my budget and also increasing the ability to share work that I love.

I don't think it's low-brow, Kristin -- good heavens, how many boxes of cards have I bought in museum shops? -- and it's something I'm considering. I'm glad you brought it up - NT also suggested that a while back. Thanks, and I'll let you know!

I envy you art's portability and presentability. The internet has allowed me two or three occasions when I've bought works of art I've been able to assess remotely without the terror of entering a gallery under the watchful and hungry eye of the artist and then been forced to turn on my heel when nothing appealed. Novels are much more cumbersome, identified (ironically) by the works of art on their cover. Extracts? How can one choose a 300-word passage as representative of a work that runs to 150,000 words? There are ways of harnessing the internet and I'm working on one at the moment. But it's laborious. As I say the virtual gallery is an elegant compact solution.

I would slightly dispute your fears about making Cassandra Pages "commercial". It's only a word, you know, and can be substituted. Think of the cash paid as a tribute to the work rather than a reductionist part of a transaction. Spoken and written praise are cheap and dubious, especially given the western world's tendency not to give offence. Cash can be seen as an unequivocal expression of pleasure.

Hah! Lorenzo, you've made me smile this morning with your keen observations about galleries, real and virtual, and your last sentence. I sold three pieces yesterday and it seems that both buyers and seller felt a good deal of pleasure!

That's wonderful news. The banner looks great. All the best for this new venture!

Bravo Beth for taking that plunge and your Etsy page looks great. I wish you great success with this venture.
I too have been thinking about doing something like this for a long time but procrastinating as usual.
But your example motivates me and I'll get moving with this ASAP.
I think it's very sensible to use Etsy rather than adding a selling section on one's own website - keeps things separate and neater. And I agree with Lorenzo, 'commercial' is only a word!
Why shouldn't we give others the pleasure of owning some of our work, while simultaneously clearing space in our studios?

Bravo and good luck; and I too am inclined to second Lorenzo (who, I might add, is the only person I've ever sold a painting to!), please don't hesitate to remind us the shop is there, with the best will in the world we may need a nudge from time to time or we'll forget that it's there. And put in a nice clear sidebar link, of course!

Your disappointment with the arts scene in Montreal is interesting, and rather reflects what I've found in France, compared not only with the UK but also what I saw in Australia and NZ and what I remember in the US too. Yes, Paris is the great city of the arts, but there's not much in the provinces.(Pont Aven, for all its trumpeting, is full of atrocious rubbish!) Partly demographics, perhaps, but I wonder if it's something about the Francophone world. I hate to react ignorantly and over-generalise about any culture, but I more and more I feel there's a dearth of personal creativity here, and wonder if a preoccupation with what you describe as the 'conceptual and intellectual', while good in some ways, isn't something to do with it.)

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